San Francisco could explore possibility of mandating solar systems on developments

San Francisco could explore possibility of mandating solar systems on developments

by : sfexaminer – excerpt

After two smaller California cities mandated that new developments install solar-energy systems, San Francisco officials are beginning to discuss a similar requirement.
The effort could build on The City’s 2008 Green Building Ordinance and also advance the goal of ensuring 100 percent of San Francisco’s electricity needs come from renewable sources.
“I think that requiring solar panels on new development is a great way to help green our city and create more good-paying clean-energy jobs for San Franciscans,” said Joshua Arce, chairman of the Commission on the Environment.
At an upcoming meeting, Arce intends to ask the commission, which sets policy direction for the Board of Supervisors, to recommend The City adopt a solar installation mandate.
Reserving judgment, board President David Chiu called it an “intriguing idea” and welcomed the conversation to determine if it was something that made sense for The City… (more)

Great idea, but solar installations need a lot of sun to produce enough power to make the system viable. The Plan Bay Area’s highrise stack and pack dense housing projects, will overshadow the solar panels on the rooftops unless someone in Sacramento puts together legislation to protect them. The sunny Eastern neighborhoods are the perfect place to generate solar power. But, only if you limit the building height to 4 or 5 stories . Anything higher can’t produce enough energy to supply the needs of the residents. Tell the supervisors and state legislators that you want to protect the sun on your roof so you can take advantage of all the new government deals on solar. Contact SF Supervisors

Very sneaky, Walmart: How the mega-retailer rolled back California regulations

Labor, environmental, and political leaders cry foul as Calif. Democrats curtail landmark environmental law

By : salon – excerpt

Labor, environmental, and political leaders cry foul as Calif. Democrats curtail landmark environmental law

While Washington has been warring over the shutdown and the debt ceiling, California Governor Jerry Brown has signed bills expanding access to abortion and restricting local police collaboration with Immigration and Customs Enforcement – bills that advocates hope will join past Golden State laws in proving to be national precedents. But if those bills have gotten little notice amid the showdown in Washington, another – signed by Brown the Friday afternoon before the shutdown – has gotten even less. It’s a “reform” that critics say waters down what’s been the country’s strongest statewide environmental law – and represents Walmart’s latest lobbying coup in a state where Democrats control every branch of government.
“It’s amazing to me how few people are willing to stand up to this corporation,” said Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez. “And mainly because they’re afraid.”… (more)

Gov. Brown signs Frazier’s fifth bill into law, to streamline bicycle transportation

Meter Madness

antiochherald – excerpted

AB 417 Will Significantly Improve Bicycle Transportation in Cities and Counties
Sacramento, CA –
Today Governor Jerry Brown signed into law Assembly Bill 417 authored by Assemblymember Jim Frazier (D – Oakley) that streamlines the CEQA process for bicycle transportation plans. “AB 417 is a common sense approach to a much needed change,” said Frazier.
AB 417 will provide a narrow exemption for bicycle transportation plans in urbanized areas and will ensure public participation and address traffic and safety impacts.
“This bill corrects the unanticipated consequences of CEQA,” said Dave Snyder from the California Bicycle Coalition, “and will allow cities to calm their traffic, install bicycle lanes, and improve bike parking and signage without enduring millions of dollars in expense and incurring years of delay.”
Biking has become a common mode of transportation for the daily commuter and is a proactive way for the public to effectively…

View original post 60 more words

California SB 743: Legislative Changes To CEQA Ease Requirements For Urban Infill Projects

Legislative Changes To CEQA Ease Requirements For Urban Infill Projects

by Kenneth A. Kecskes : mondaq – excerpt

California lawmakers further streamlined the environmental review of infill residential, mixed-use and “employment center” projects under a new bill passed at the end of the legislative session in September.

By way of background, all development projects must comply with the California Environmental Quality Act (“CEQA”) prior to project approval. Under CEQA, state and local agencies must identify the significant environmental impacts of a proposed development project and avoid or mitigate those impacts, if feasible.

Senate Bill 743 was initially intended as a CEQA streamlining bill for a new sports and entertainment arena for the Sacramento Kings, an NBA team at risk of being lured away by another U.S. city. Legislative leaders and the business community have been asking for broader CEQA reform, because the environmental review process is time-consuming and fraught with litigation risk for developers and local governments. After last minute talks among the Governor and legislative leaders, the bill was amended to begin to ease requirements for certain classes of urban infill projects statewide.

The most significant changes: Inadequate parking and aesthetic impacts cannot be used to challenge a project under CEQA if the project is “on an infill site within a transit priority area.”… (more)

CEQA Roundup: A few provisions get applause as governor quietly signs CEQA reform bill

Governor signed a bill that will streamline the CEQA process for a new Sacramento Kings arena, while also making several other changes to how CEQA works for infill developments statewide

by Justin Ewers : caeconomy.org – excerpt

There was no fanfare, no big press conference, not even a signing statement (though maybe this should have sufficed). In the end, Gov. Jerry Brown signed Sen. Darrell Steinberg’s final CEQA reform bill late on a Friday afternoon, a time-honored way to avoid media attention.

The governor left it to a spokesperson to explain his views on a bill that will streamline the CEQA process for a new Sacramento Kings arena, while also making several other changes to how CEQA works for infill developments statewide. “We were pleased to play a part in broadening the impacts of this bill,” said Evan Westrup, a spokesman for the governor… (more)

%d bloggers like this: