SB 827 is up for reconsideration on April 24 after the bill lost this week.

Clearing up the details of the SB 827 vote

A number of misinformed statements regarding the vote on SB 827 have been circulating. This is the official statement signed by the Chair of the Transportation and Housing Committee, Senator Beall. The vote was 6 no, 4 aye, and 3 not voting. If Scott can talk some into changing their votes, he can still pass this out of committee, however, he faces a much more difficult time getting it passed in the next committee in time to get it through the to the full Senate by the deadline. Still, some people will show up to oppose this one, since they will be opposing SB 828 as well.

Thanks to these bills, and a few others our Northern representatives are forcing on the state residents, many Southern California citizens are rising up to flex their rather large and powerful political powers. This year could see some changes coming to our state legislature that may shift the power away from the Bay Area. Too much too fast and too disruptive is creating a bad environment for the easy-going California lifestyle we have come to love and appreciate and there is a movement to resurrect it.

Here is a link to the Senate Transportation and housing committee schedule:  http://stran.senate.ca.gov/content/2017-2018-bill-hearings

Here is a link to the official voting results on SB 827 and a copy of the page below:

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The following is a link to the Senate Transportation and housing committee schedule:

The next link is how they voted on SB 827:
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SB 831: Senator Wiener’s Wacky World on Steroids Must be Defeated!

By Hydee R. Feldstein : citywatchla – excerpt (includes a great graphic)

CALL TO ACTION-On January 4, 2018, Senator Bob Wieckowski introduced SB 831, a bill that would have amended the just-last-year enacted “Granny Flats” sections of state law to require, rather than simply permit, cities, states and other municipalities to provide by ordinance for the creation of “junior accessory dwelling units”, or so-called ADUs…

The original version of Senator Wieckowski’s bill left the substance of the ordinance up to local authorities and expressly permitted the local authorities to include the type of restrictions included in the 2017 version of the ADU law – restrictions on the size and number, compliance with typical utility, safety and habitability regulations and requirement of owner occupancy.

As originally proposed, SB 831 appeared to have little effect on Los Angeles, a city that has already passed an ADU ordinance since SB 831 left in the express requirements that a locality could require a permit for and otherwise expressly regulate the plans, size, setbacks and other attributes of an ADU, including limiting ADUs to a single 500 square foot structure per owner occupied lot.

Then, on March 13, 2018, as cities and their residents were becoming aware of Senator Wiener’s authored bills – SB 827 and 828 – he signed on as a co-author to Senator Wieckowski’s SB 831 with amendments. Those “amendments” twisted the concept of ADUs into a junior version of Wiener’s dystopian landscape – tall, skinny buildings filled with dorm rooms and bike racks dropped in to disrupt, displace and destroy single family and small multi-family residences. SB 831, as amended by Senator Wiener, now:..

SB 831 IS SCHEDULED FOR HEARING BEFORE THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND HOUSING ON APRIL 17 AT 3:30 PM STATE CAPITOL BUILDING, ROOM 4203, 10th and L Street. You can find the agenda here(more)

Please read and comment on the source and check out the graphics.
Agenda and action item is SB 831

Who is causing California’s housing shortage?

Wiener World on your block

If you don’t want Wiener World on your block, learn more about the attempts to remover local community jurisdiction over land use and zoning and the players in Sacramento who are trying to gentrify the state. Attend the April 28th forum on SB 827 and Beyon.

Everyone has a theory about who’s to blame for the housing shortage that’s driving up prices and chasing families out of the region and state.

A new poll offers surprising insights into where most of us point the finger: not at the government officials who control what homes are built where, but at the tech companies and the real estate developers trying to maximize profits.

Experts say finding someone to blame is not that simple. The real answer, they say, lies tangled in a complicated web that implicates everyone involved, from businesses to local elected officials to your next door neighbor. And the stakes are high for policy makers trying to untangle that web as the housing crisis intensifies. To solve the problem, it’s crucial to understand the factors that turned the state’s real estate market into one of the country’s most dysfunctional… (more)

Who do you trust and who do you blame for the sorry state of the state of California? Why are there so many empty units if housing the homeless is a priority? Getting those units filled should be the top goal, not centralized top down planning. Attend the April 28th forum on SB 827 and Beyond.

 

Bayer-Monsanto Merger and Stack and Pack housing Is Bad News for the Planet

Op-Ed by Zrants

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Grapes depend on birds and insects to reproduce. What will we use when the natural pollinators die off? Robotic insects? photo by zrants

Merging corporations are a huge threat to every industry, including food production. Ellen Brown generally writes about the economy and public banking. This article, The Bayer-Monsanto Merger Is Bad News for the Planet, goes back to her original focus on holistic heath solutions and deals with the problems that come from not upholding anti-trust laws. Too-big-to-fail banks are not our only problem. When you look at the issues raised over government involvement, or lack of oversight, in the global food industry in conjunction with government manipulations in the housing industry, the future does not look rosy.

Stack and pack development theories go beyond concerns over how to live independent lives. Sucking people into dense housing and work environments does nothing for the planet but it does force everyone to live in dependence of the government-sanctioned grids: electric, water, sewer, media, wifi, transit, and alt currency banking systems, to name a few. Landless Americans Are the New Serf Class, questions the legitimacy of the current development decisions by pointing out some of the major inconsistencies and problems with the way the government is directing us to live.

Our education system is turning out perfect on-demand consumers hooked on instant gratification, not independent thinkers capable of solving problems. Important jobs are unfilled because no one bothered to learn the skills. Do we know what we are losing or what kind of world we are building?

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Old and new versions of bus shelter designs photo by zrants

What kind of future are we designing and who is it for? We need designers who base design on science, not theory. Look at the new bus “shelters”, if you can call them that, for a perfect example of bad design. Whoever designed these non-shelter shelters should not be qualified to design anything. There is no utilitarian integrity in a bus shelter with less seats and no protection from the rain. The deal SFMTA cut for these non-shelters is indicative of what is wrong with the SFMTA and many government agencies. What did the public get put of the deal? a shelter that is not a shelter in exchange for ad space, that brings in less ad revenue.

We do not need an economy and society modeled on future projections on predictive behavior handed down to us from top level public-private entities that are more concerned with controlling public behavior than corporate behavior. What will it take for society to prioritize human development and creative thinking over financial growth?

please continue to support our efforts to control our land use and zoning by stopping bills like SB 827. Sign the petition and write your state reps.

 

Stronger rent control supported by just one major candidate for California governor

: sacbee – excerpt

Delaine Eastin is the only major candidate for California governor to unequivocally support a potential November ballot measure that would allow stronger local rent control laws across the state.

Eastin, a Democrat and former state schools chief, said she supports the outright repeal of the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act, which prevents rent control ordinances from applying to housing built after 1995, as well as single-family homes, duplexes and condos.

“It hasn’t worked and it’s time to repeal it,” Eastin said at a candidate forum Thursday hosted by the advocacy nonprofit Housing California. Proponents of repeal, financed in part by Los Angeles activist Michael Weinstein of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, have gathered more than 250,000 of the 365,880 signatures they need to qualify by next month…

Eastin is trailing in the polls behind other Democrats — Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and state Treasurer John Chiang. Rent control advocates voiced strong support for her after she backed Costa-Hawkins repeal at the California Democratic Party convention last month. She won 20 percent of delegate votes, behind Newsom and Chiang, while Villaraigosa got 9 percent…(more)

RELATED:
Rent control and health care: Liberals fight for the soul of the California Democratic Party

L.A. votes to fight state lawmaker’s push for high-density housing

: latimes – excerpt

The Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to oppose a bill allowing residential buildings of four to eight stories on streets near public transit, despite objections from business leaders and groups that favor higher-density housing.

The 13-0 vote makes L.A. the largest municipality in California to come out against Senate Bill 827, which would loosen or eliminate restrictions on height, density, parking and design for residential projects near bus and rail stops…(more)

CaRLA lines up cities to sue

Renters group sues city over Haskell vote

By Emilie Raguso: berkeleyside – excerpt

As promised in February, a Bay Area renters group has sued the Berkeley City Council — again — over its rejection of a three-unit infill housing project on Haskell Street…

The renters group says the zoning board found the project in line with all city development standards, and that council did not cite grounds to reject it. The group says the state Housing Accountability Act is the legal basis for its lawsuit… (more)

San Mateo denies housing. CaRLA fights back.

San Mateo, CA – March 1, 2018: Today we signaled our intent to file a lawsuit against the City of San Mateo, CA alleging that the city violated the state’s Housing Accountability Act with an unlawful denial of a housing project. In 2017, a modest housing project was proposed for 4 West Santa Inez Avenue that would add 10 units to the Bay Area’s already scarce housing supply. On February 5, 2018, San Mateo City Council voted to deny the project.

The City of San Mateo denied the project on the grounds that “the structures, site plan, and landscaping are not in scale and are not harmonious with the
character of the neighborhood”. We allege that the city’s reason for denial of the project was based on subjective criteria, which is a violation of the Housing Accountability Act’s requirement that projects be denied for objective, well-defined criteria…(more)

The best reasons to oppose SB 827 are YIMBY, SFBARF and CaRLA. They plan to take local control away from cities, demanding high density housing everywhere, and then sue when cities don’t meet their demands.

SF lawmaker threatens to sue state if transit-oriented development bill passes

By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez : sfexaminer – excerpt

Opposition to a state bill that would increase housing density and heights near transit routes is building. Now one city lawmaker is threatening legal action.

Supervisor Aaron Peskin on Monday pledged to sue the state to overturn Senate Bill 827 should it be approved.

“I am an unabashed opponent,” Peskin told a packed crowd of San Franciscans at a Board of Supervisors Land Use Committee hearing on a resolution he authored that would put The City on record as opposing the bill.

Peskin said the bill carried echoes of the redevelopment of the Western Addition, which displaced much of The City’s black community, and places San Francisco on the “precipice” of displacement.

Though the Board of Supervisors has no authority to direct the City Attorney’s Office, Peskin said he would explore the possibility with the office… (more)

When did our lawmakers in Sacramento decide that it is OK to powertrip us the way that Trump is stepping on their authority? The power grab out of Sacramento is not lost on the voters. Citizens from San Diego to Eureka have gotten the message that Sacramento is attempting a major shift in state Land Use and zoning policies, and they are fighting back. What are the options if you don’t like what is happening? At least two recalls are on the ballot so far due to angry voters. More may follow.

Legal pushbacks are already coming from both sides. Our ex-mayor, governor-wannbe, Newsom, lead the suit against San Francisco over who has the right to determine the development of the waterfront. The state settled that one.  YIMBYs, lead by Sonja Trauss, who is running for D-6 Supervisor,  are suing cities they claim are not meeting their YIMBY density goals, using the 1982 Housing Accountability Act . SB 827 and 828 will give the YIMBYs more fuel to sue. If you want to stop this power grab send letters to the Board of Supervisors and your state legislators to let them know how you feel about the state power grab and SB 827 and 828.

How affordable housing mandates make housing more expensive

 : latimes – excerpt

This month the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether to hear a legal challenge to San Jose’s controversial inclusionary housing ordinance. Enacted in 2010 and upheld by California’s top court in June, this zoning law requires housing developers of 20 or more units to sell 15% of them at prices far below their market value or pay a six-figure fee instead…(more)

Wiener’s Even More Onerous Senate Bill 828

While Senate Bill 827 is getting all the attention it deserves, sitting in its’ shadow is another equally onerous Senate Bill proposed by Scott Wiener and likely authored again his partner in crime Brian Hanlon – See Senate Bill 828 with the innocuous title “Land Use: Housing Element”

For decades every city and county in California has been given a housing quota, or “Regional Housing Needs Assessment” allocation (RHNA, often pronounced ree-na) that it must plan for. Cities don’t build housing or submit housing proposals (a fatal flaw in Wiener’s Senate Bill 828 we’ll come back to) but these quotas require that cities and counties produce specific numbers of units at different income levels.

These quotas are calculated by a number of regional government bodies such as the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), and the Association of Monterey Bay Area Governments (AMBAG)…

Senate Bills 35 and 828 – A deadly cocktail

The fundamental flaw of Senate Bill 35 is that cities do not control how many development proposals are submitted for approval. Yet, SB 35 holds cities accountable for how many units they approve. Anyone can easily understand this disconnect. Wiener and Hanlon who authored SB35 chose not to…

SB 828 dramatically increases RHNA quotas(more)

Thankfully a lot of California cities and counties are demanding their state reps oppose this bill. NO amendment will work when the intent is to overturn local jurisdiction over land use and zoning, as these bills are doing. Either you are for centralized government and the state control of your city or not.