Strategic Combination of FivePoint Holdings Creates Largest Developer of Mixed-Use Communities In Coastal California

prnewswire – excerpt

ALISO VIEJO, Calif., May 4, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Four of the most innovative, master-planned communities and their management company are being combined to form FivePoint Holdings, LLC, which is now the largest developer of mixed-use communities in coastal California.

FivePoint will own interests in and manage (1) The San Francisco Shipyard, (2) Candlestick Point in San Francisco, (3) Newhall Ranch in Los Angeles County and (4) Great Park Neighborhoods in Irvine all led by Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Emile Haddad. All four communities, located in major urban areas, are planned to provide critically needed housing adjacent to job centers while maintaining the important balance between growth and the preservation of California’s unique quality of life…

Lennar Corporation, one of the nation’s largest homebuilders, formerly held equity positions in each of the four communities and the management company. Under this strategic combination of communities, Lennar has become the largest investor in FivePoint…

ABOUT FIVEPOINT HOLDINGS:

Spanning the state from Southern California to the San Francisco Bay Area, FivePoint is now the largest owner and developer of mixed-use, master planned communities in coastal California based on the total number of residential homesites permitted under existing entitled zoning. These four existing communities represent major real estate developments in three of the most dynamic and supply-constrained markets along the California coast—Orange County, Los Angeles County and San Francisco County(more)

 

 

 

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SF halts Mission housing development over ‘bulky’ design

By Michael Barba : sfexaminer – excerpt

The “bulky” design of a mostly market-rate housing development slated to span several lots of Mission Street prevented the project from moving forward at the Planning Commission last week.

The development would take advantage of the state density bonus law allowing developers to build denser and taller than typically permitted in exchange for on-site affordable housing.

It would rise eight stories near Mission and 25th streets and bring 75 units of housing to the neighborhood, including eight units rented at below-market-rate prices. The project is also just a block away from the 24th Street BART Station and has spots for bicycles rather than car parking.

But several commissioners were troubled by the size and design of the proposal, which would replace a laundromat and outdoor parking lot on three lots of Mission Street.

“It’s just basically plopping a foreign object into this area and not thinking about its consequences,” said Commissioner Kathrin Moore.

The commission unanimously voted last Thursday to delay a decision on the project until late November, asking the developer to redraw the plans as multiple buildings rather than one… (more)

 

Map shows which SF neighborhoods are hit hardest by air pollution

 By Rachel Swan : sfchronicle – exceprt (includes map)

Cranes

This zrants photo was taken over a week ago. There were twice as many cranes yesterday.

Black dust cakes the poplar trees in South Park, the San Francisco waterfront neighborhood at the western end of the Bay Bridge…

Congestion — defined as traffic flowing below 35 miles per hour on the city’s freeways — increased from 3.8 percent of the time in 2010 to 5.7 percent in 2015…
A few years ago, Rogers discovered that her gentrifying neighborhood is among the most polluted in the city. SoMa is the locus of San Francisco’s building boom, so people are pouring in and cars are jamming the streets, many of which funnel traffic to and from the Bay Bridge… (more)

The number one factor in the increase in bad air in San Francisco is construction. There are cars all over the city and the freeways are no more jammed than before, although the speeds are slower. If the following is correct, and  “Congestion — defined as traffic flowing below 35 miles per hour on the city’s freeways — increased from 3.8 percent of the time in 2010 to 5.7 percent in 2015.”, the solution would be to speed the freeway traffic up the traffic, not slow it down the way SFMTA is doing by slowing the freeway access road traffic. See the many complaints about Potrero, Van Ness, and Lombard.

This article fails to place much of the blame on the construction zones, even though the largest number of cranes in the sky are in SOMA, and Mission Bay around the Warriors stadium and the medical center, where pollution is highest.

If SB 35 passes and the construction moves west, the bad air will follow. The solid massing of buildings along narrow streets stops the breeze and traps more bad air the same way a mountain does.

Perhaps a new approach to keeping traffic out might be to move the jobs out to where the people live now rather than figuring out how to move the people to the jobs each day. Palo Alto wants to try building less office space. Sounds like a familiar approach SF tried a few years ago. Hope their legislators do a better job of writing the law than ours did wuth Prop M. hint: Use the word “must” not “shall”.

Rare Outer Sunset housing development may use new local density bonus

By Michael Barba : sfexaminer – excerpt

The architect behind a rare four-story housing development in the Outer Sunset said he is considering using the new density bonus program in San Francisco to build more units and a taller structure than currently planned.

Architect Kodor Baalbaki designed the plans for a mixed-use building with 18 residential units at Lawton Street and 42nd Avenue, the current site of a 76 gas station. Proposed in June, the plans include two below-market-rate units under Proposition C’s inclusionary housing requirements.

The project is likely raising eyebrows in the Sunset for proposing a building taller than the two-story houses that fill the neighborhood. The Outer Sunset has one of the highest numbers of single-family homes in San Francisco and has largely been untouched by new development as cranes tower elsewhere.

The project would be one of the first known developments to add more units and height through the new Home-SF density bonus program from Supervisor Katy Tang, who represents the Sunset District.

Home-SF, which went into effect last Thursday, allows certain developers to build two stories above height-limits and add more density in exchange for 30 percent on-site affordable housing.

While Baalbaki said using the density bonus is under consideration, there are still issues that need to be pencilled out, such as pricing, height and the number of affordable units on-site.

“I actually had a phone call from the office of Supervisor Katy Tang and we talked about it and I asked them for more information,” Baalbaki said. “I believe more information could clarify this issue and we are willing to technically find out if there is a way of making this happen.”… (more)

 

More hearings on Water Quality and Groundwater Safety concerns

Guest writer:

Dear Water Warriors,

If SF has plenty of water in storage*, why is the city blending?
The state may be requiring SF to do so but…why?
How much is DPW involved in this “blended” water project?
After all, pipes are repaired, re-routed by DPW…& if there is an “emergency,” aren’t there federal funds?**  Could this be part of OneBayArea Plan to support the 1 million people for our future city? But since we don’t have the $, do they need to mess with it and then “fix” it? Hate to think so…but really, why? See some detailed information about other city experiments with changing water sources in the links below:

“San Francisco Ordered to Stop Using Century-Old Water Rights” (KQED 6/26/2015)
https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2015/06/26/san-francisco-ordered-to-stop-using-century-old-water-rights/ according to Steve Ritchie: “We have plenty of water in storage.”

“Fight over senior water rights splashes into the Capitol” (SF Chronicle 3/21/16)
http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Fight-over-senior-water-rights-splashes-into-the-6932476.php

Senior water rights data – California
http://hosted.ap.org/specials/interactives/_data/ca_water_rights/

PBS link to “Poisoned Water” video about the Flint, Michigan, water crisis:
http://www.pbs.org/video/3001355667/

** Flint received $10 billion from the federal government to “fix” the water emergency problem (subsidies ran out, water rates increased): http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/senate-approves-bill-water-projects-millions-flint/

Flint said it was costing them too much for their water system so was this all just to get $$$? to be used like wherever the officials wanted? This is so weird.

There’s a bunch of other articles on Flint on the pbs website:
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/tag/flint-water-crisis/

Assembly passes bill to limit land-use ballot initiatives

By Tim Redmond : 48hills – excerpt

Chiu, Ting both vote for measure that raises the threshold for citizen initiatives on development to 55 percent.

A bill that would make it harder for local residents to pass ballot measures limiting development has passed the state Assembly with almost no opposition – and so far, with almost no discussion in San Francisco, where citizen initiatives have been a powerful tool against an industry that often controls City Hall.

AB 943, by Assemblymember Miguel Santiago, was directly aimed at the growth-limiting Measure S in Los Angeles. But it could have sweeping impacts on cities and counties all over the state.

The measure would raise the threshold to 55 percent for any community-based ballot measure that would “reduce density or stop development or construction of any parcels located less than one mile from a transit stop.”

That’s all of San Francisco… (more)

Continue reading

WHAT’S HAPPENING TO OUR WATER QUALITY?

Liberty Hill Neighborhood Association with Noe Neighborhood Council will hold aPUBLIC FORUM ON GROUNDWATER MIXING
TUESDAY, JUNE 6TH, 7:00-9:00 PM
1010 VALENCIA STREET @ 21ST ST.

Tap water photo by zrants

On April 18th, the SFPUC began mixing lower quality, minimally treated
groundwater with our pristine Hetch Hetchy drinking water. Concerns were raised
at the first Supervisor’s Public Safety Committee Hearing on May 24th.

We’re bringing together the SFPUC with knowledgeable residents to continue
this discussion. This forum encourages active community participation.

Please note the new location: 1010 Valencia St. @ 21st St. (not City College-Mission).

San Francisco Approves Ordinance Expanding Density Bonuses for Affordable Projects

By Emily Bias : judsupra – excerpt

Almost 18 months after it was introduced, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors recently approved Ordinance 150969, which creates development bonuses for private development projects where at least 30% of the units are subject to affordability restrictions. Known as the HOME-SF Program, the legislation allows qualifying projects to exceed otherwise applicable height restrictions by up to 20 feet and allows developers to select three additional zoning modifications from a menu of options, which includes reductions in required rear-yard setbacks and modifications to parking, exposure, and open space requirements. HOME-SF projects must also include on-site family-friendly amenities, such as dedicated bicycle parking and stroller storage, open space, and yard dedicated for use by children… (more)

Judge Keeps Ban on San Francisco’s Tenant-Payout Law

By : courthousenews – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO (CN) – A federal judge refused Tuesday to vacate his judgment that the city of San Francisco had enacted an unconstitutionally burdensome ordinance requiring landlords to provide evicted tenants with massive lump-sum payouts.

The city wanted U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer to vacate a judgment barring enforcement of the law, since its board of supervisors later amended the ordinance to lower the payout amount.

But Breyer said the judgment needn’t be vacated because the city essentially repealed its own law.

“The court likewise concludes that the city’s voluntary action mooted this case,” Breyer wrote... (more)

 

Plan Bay Area 2040 Open House This Week in San Francisco

satprnews – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO, May 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) and the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) invite the public to an open house in San Francisco (Bay Area Metro Center, Yerba Buena Conference Room, 375 Beale Street) on Wednesday, May 17, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. to learn about an update to the region’s long-range transportation and housing roadmap known as Plan Bay Area 2040. This meeting in San Francisco is one in a series to be held in all nine Bay Area counties between May 4 and May 22. For more information about upcoming meeting times, dates and locations in all nine counties, please visit the Plan Bay Area website: www.PlanBayArea.org(more)

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